Blog Archives

The value of Preschool Ballet

This blog will look at why it’s important for you to see value in your child’s pre-ballet and beginning ballet classes.

You have LOTS of options for extracurricular activities these days, even for pre-school aged children and younger! While at a young age, most extracurricular activities provide a lot of the same benefits to children (social interaction, following instructions, etc.), but our preschool ballet programme is designed to offer something a little extra special

  • We run our preschool sessions on a theme – The Nutcracker or Cinderella or the Enchanted Forest and so we hold short, 5-10 minute parent observations at the end of every block of sessions
  • Each new theme will include a small parent information pack with our objectives – including what your child will be working on in class as well as one or two activities you can practice with your  child at home. This allows you to have some fun dance time together at home and also let you see the progress your child is making.
  • It may seem like there isn’t a lot of technique – but this is by design. They will learn all the basics for their age and appropriate dance level, and we gradually introduce the correct terms and develop their technique once we have the basics – we don’t want any overwhelm!
  • It is more than just becoming a ballet dancer. Children a learning so much more than helps them OUTSIDE of ballet: interacting with other children, making friends, taking turns, following instructions, and working hard toward a goal, just to name a few.
  • We have themed sticker charts and certificates for students at the end of each session – so you can see what they have achieved and also lets our amazing students show their progress. It gives them something to be proud of.

So why not book a place on our next course – January will see us follow the classical ballet Cinderella – 2pm Mondays at Church of the Ascension

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Improvisation

Improvisation is key to being a good dancer. It comes from being able to listen to music, and interpret the emotions and story through movement.

It is also done with very little preparation – there are no hours of choreography to do, no weeks of research – it’s about reaction and feeling.

You will know – sometimes a song comes on and you get a certain urge to move. This is especially true for dancers – though it is not simply a wiggle or step and tap. You hear accents that require leaps, or crescendos that require expansive moves.

Your body reacts to show whether the song portrays hurt or joy.

Talking through what a song makes you feel – is a great way to introduce even the littlest ones to improvisation. Does it make them happy? Do they think they should run or jump? Should they float like a fairy? Does it sound angry and stampy?

This is just one way dance is amazing for a child’s development – especially their emotional well being. Being able to understand and recognise feelings that come from events and sounds.

Pick some of your favourite songs and ask them what they think. Things like the music from “Frozen” or “Aladdin” by Disney are great as they are designed to evoke feelings.