How to improve your dancer’s posture

Recent studies have show that up to 40% of children have poor posture – a lot of this is linked to too much slumping in front of screens and a general disposition to slouching. Heavy school bags also play a part.

Dance requires proper posture – not just to see the graceful lines, but also to move easier, and breathe better.

So on this Technique Tuesday – here are 5 ways that both we at class and you at home can help improve your dancer’s posture.

1. Demonstrate and show videos or pictures

Most classes see a move or combination demonstrated and the children aim to copy this, this is part of their learning. Posture is the same. Our teachers try to demonstrate good posture in classes – and especially when teaching moves.

“Most dancers learn visually, so they’ll try to mimic proper body position, but often they don’t understand the roots of where it’s coming from,” Chelsie Hightower, a performer on “Dancing with The Stars,” explained to Dance Spirit.

For this reason, it’s often helpful to show your children pictures or videos of proper posture when standing or sitting – see below.

Good Posture 
Head over heart, heart over hips
shoulders down and relaxed
face forward and don't drop the chin
breathing should be easy and going into the belly

2. Stretching

Stretching is a great way to not only maintain good posture and ensure that the muscles front and back are working equally, but can be used to correct poor posture

  • Chest and shoulder stretch: If they slump forward (that head dropped looking at the phone pose) this activity is often helpful for dancers who slump forward. Have them lie on their backs with their arms stretched outward and elbows bent into a bench-press position. They just need to squeeze their shoulder blades together without arching their backs and hold for 10 seconds, and repeat 4 times.
  • Butt bridge: Another area that can cause bad posture is the hips being tight in one area and not strong enough in another. This is a great one to help. Get them to lie on their backs with their knees bent and feet on the floor. Have them squeeze their butts and push their hips toward the ceiling. Hold for 10 seconds, and repeat four times.

3. Core Exercises

I’m not suggesting 3 year olds start on the sit ups. Dance itself will help with this and we do incorporate these in class in fun ways. We have plank challenges, we do V sits – using pilates, yoga and even some boxing excerises along side the ballet, jazz and acro work. The core is the full surrounded mid section – not just the ‘abs’. If this is something older dancers want to work on drop me a message (leanne@reactdance.co.uk) or catch me in class.

4. Fun with props

We can do this from teeny tiny to teens and older. Props can be a great way to check on the posture – bean bags or books on the head while we move will show if they slouch or drop their chin, or walk with an emphasis on one side. It can even be a fun game to play at home.

Good posture notes for dancers

5. Practice Makes Permanent

Posture needs to be in their minds the whole way through – class, through practice, at home. Its not about constantly walking around like you’re attached to a stick! But remembering to hold yourself upright and tall with all the elements described above.

I always say practice may not make perfect but it will make permanent – it means it will become easier to sit, stand or dance with good posture if you work on it regularly than it will to slouch!

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About Leanne

Principal at React Dance Academy - providing dance and performing arts education for under 18's in Kenton, Newcastle. Studied with, and continuing our development with the IDTA

Posted on September 3, 2019, in Benefits of dance, Dance Skills, How to guide and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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