Correcting your child

Every class sees so many children trying hard to do their best, sometimes as well as praising them for their hard work and effort, we as teachers will need to correct them and their positioning.

This is not “telling off”, it is not a bad thing!

It is a way to help your child improve, and reach their full dancing potential.

Active Instruction

Active instruction is our main way of helping your child. Negative comments such as “don’t do” aren’t helpful as while they point out the mistake, they don’t offer a solution. We always try to include what to do, and sometimes ignore the don’t part all together.

For example instead of saying “don’t slouch” we’d suggest “reaching the top of the head up towards the ceiling”, or instead of “don’t roll your feet”, to “keep all 5 toes on the floor.”

Oblique instructions

These are to be avoided as they highlight the what but not the how. Our aim is always to offer the solution, just like in active instruction, but as they get older, making references to the body parts and positioning, as with experience a dancer will get to know a lot more about the anatomy.

Accepting criticism

Welcome criticism, tell your children that it is not a bad thing to receive a correction. Firstly, it shows the care the teacher has for the child, that they are paying attention to them and their dancing. Secondly, it will help them progress if they act on it and take on board what they say. It will allow them to improve and get better. And give them something to work on because practicing something incorrectly is the worst thing you can do as practice makes permanent!

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About Leanne

Principal at React Dance Academy - providing dance and performing arts education for under 18's in Kenton, Newcastle. Studied with, and continuing our development with the IDTA

Posted on November 11, 2016, in Dance Skills, How to guide and tagged , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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