Understanding…. Freestyle

Freestyle dance is a very popular form of dance with both structured exams and competitions forming a major part of this style.

History (Summarised from Anna Jones – Freestyle Dance)

In 1978 the era of Disco dancing was truly born in the UK. For months we eagerly anticipated the arrival of the dance craze that was sweeping America. This was all due to one film and one performer, John Travolta in Saturday Night Fever! Travolta brought a message across to millions of young people that here was a lad with a mundane nine-till-five, poorly paid job, who was able to become a success in a different way – he could dance, and dance well! His reputation at the local Discotheque was a legend and when he entered that atmosphere at night he was respected and hero-worshiped. At this time Antony Allen made several trips to the States in order to bring back much of the work emanating from the film. And as well as many of the “Disco” moves, he brought back Hustle, a “together” dance that was also made popular by the film. Dance classes specialising in the “Night Fever” routines quickly became popular in all areas of the UK.

It was at this point that a number of professionals decided to carry on where the film had left off. Using chart music at the time, they began working out their own routines, often cautious at first then increasing in confidence as the pupils continued to enjoy the work that they were creating. As time progressed more varied and interesting work was included in the routines which was graded according to the standard of the class. Ultimately, greater rhythmical interpretation was involved and the use of more body parts.

What is Freestyle Dance?

It’s an artistic dance form that co-ordinates accentuated body movements with a number of basic steps incorporating arm, head and hand positions and movements. This is developed by the teachers who need to keep abreast of modern trends and music, whilst allowing the dancer freedom to express their own individual interpretation. The development of a top class Freestyle dancer requires the understanding of several basic principals in order to create good style and technique. I.e. Good timing, as with any other form of dance is essential. Choreography needs to be tailored to suit the age, grade and capability of each dancer. Extension and projection are also important aspects of Freestyle dance. Presentation as with other forms of dance needs to be aesthetic to the eye in every possible detail. Personality is an attribute that does or does not come naturally, but this can be developed by building confidence and practising facial expression.

Freestyle Dance contains a great variety of steps and movements particularly in the choreography of the higher grade dancers. However, the three “basic ingredients” of Freestyle Dance relating to solo work are runs, spins and kicks. Almost all dancers in intermediate grades and above will perform these steps as part of their routine in one form or another. Beginners will generally use less progressive types of movements but will normally have some running steps in their routines. Kicks are often introduced at starter level and spins developed for intermediate and above. The basic steps and movements include different types of Walks and Runs, a variety of turns and spins e.g. Switch Turn, Whisk Turn, Twist Turn, Progressive and Accelerated Spins. Kicks and Flicks to include Cross-Tap-Kick, Flick Ball Change, Spring Kick and Hitch Kick. Various jumps and leaps e.g. Star Jump, Stag Leap and Scissors Jump. Plus balletic type movements e.g. Arabesque, Pirouette and Developpe.

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About Leanne

Principal at React Dance Academy - providing dance and performing arts education for under 18's in Kenton, Newcastle. Studied with, and continuing our development with the IDTA

Posted on November 9, 2016, in Experience Dance and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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